Conservation and Coexistence in Tanzania and Kenya

KARATU DISTRICT, TANZANIA

BEEHIVE FENCES
NO. OF NEW TRAINEE BEEKEEPERS: 25 | NO. OF ACRES PROTECTING: 15

Wildlife corridors are essential for ensuring freedom of movement between important habitats. In Tanzania, elephants rely on one last remaining wildlife corridor to travel from the Ngorongoro Crater to Silele Forest and Lake Manyara. Village land is cultivated directly alongside the elephant migration routes and the Northern Highlands Forest Reserve, making this area a key HEC hotspot.

Wild Survivors partners with Upper Kitete village in Karatu District, whose land borders the wildilfe corridor and the forest reserve. The forest encircles the Ngorongoro Crater, a UNESCO World Heritage site, home to around 1,000 elephants. In partnership with PAMS Foundation, we are installing beehive fences on neighbouring farmland. The beehives form a naturally protective barrier between migrating elephants and the crops, while also creating a sustainable livelihood in honey and wax production.

Our new biofuel initiative will utilise cow dung to provide an environmentally-friendly fuel and heat source. The project is in its research stage and will be trialled in Upper Kitete village to prevent tree felling in the wildlife corridor.

READ MORE ABOUT OUR NATURAL SOLUTIONS HERE

 The Wild Survivors Field Team is formed of members of the community who we recruit and train to fulfil vital project roles including Data & Research Coordinator, Beekeeping Officers and Bee Guardians. Responsibilities include monitoring elephant activity, collecting data on crop raids, managing and maintaining the beehive fence, and being a direct liaison between the community and our operations team.

LAIKIPIA, KENYA

BUZZBOX WILDLIFE TECH
NO. OF BUZZBOX UNITS DEPLOYED: 4 | NO. OF ACRES PROTECTING: 10

Leveraging the success of our beehive fences in Tanzania, we are expanding this
innovative natural solution through trialling BuzzBox audio deterrent devices on two key project sites in Kenya. The device imitates the sounds of a hive, tapping into elephants’ innate fear of bees. The first location is in Laikipia, a province north of Nairobi bordering which borders the Lolldaiga Hills and Muramati village. The community experiences high volumes of elephant crop raiding during intensive periods throughout the year. Now in its third phase, BuzzBox MK3 is defending a plot under the guidance of our in-country tech manager, Louis Kabbani. On completion of this final testing phase, our first BuzzBox community project will commence in Muramati village.

SAGALLA, TSAVO EAST NATIONAL PARK, KENYA

BUZZBOX WILDLIFE TECH
NO. OF BUZZBOX UNITS DEPLOYED: 5 | NO. OF FARMS PROTECTING: 2

Our second BuzzBox project was born from a collaboration with between Wild
Survivors, Dr Lucy King and Save the Elephants (STE). In November 2019, the team installed five BuzzBox MK3 units on two community farms in Sagalla Hills, a village on the border on Tsavo East National Park. The devices compleiment the successful beehive fence project in the village, and are installed in place of empty hives on vulnerable farm boundaries, just in time for the crop raiding season. A further fifteen units will follow early next year, to create our most ambitious wildlife tech project yet.

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